Definition: Spiritual Tourism

noun

spi·ri·tual·tou·ri·sm

Spiritual tourism is about gaining spiritual experience and enlightenment to improve oneself wellbeing - body, mind and spirit. Activities such as visiting holy and spiritual places of worship belonging to different religions (church, temples, synagogue, and mosques).

It could also be defined as traveling on pilgrimage to acquire enlightenment, entertainment, and as well as education through expressing your gratitude to God.

Video credit to : Vietnam News Agency

Several Spiritual Places On Earth

Camino de Santiago, Spain

Camino de Santiago, a world-renowned hiking trail in Spain, the Camino de Santiago was originally used as a route for pilgrims to reach the city of Santiago de Compostela in northern Spain, where (it’s rumored) Saint James is buried.

Varanasi

Varanasi in India, known as the “Spiritual heart of India”, Varanasi is India’s oldest city, lies right along the banks of the Ganges, and is dripping in chaos and color. This historical city is said to be the place where Buddhism was founded, and today is a destination where many, including Buddhists and Hindus, go to pray.

Cape Reinga

Cape Reinga, New Zealand, traditionally known as Te Rerenga Wairua, is situated on the northern tip of New Zealand’s North Island. Sacred to the Maori people, Cape Reinga is regarded as the “leaping place of the spirits”, as they believe that the souls of recently deceased Maori use the cape as a place to depart earth and enter the afterlife.

Borobudur, Indonesia

Borobudur, Indonesia, located on the Indonesian island of Java and was built from two million stone blocks in the shape of a giant mandala — a diagram of a perfect universe. In true Buddhist vision, the structure is a pyramid of steps that worshipers climb around clockwise, with the middle of the structure representing Nirvana.

The Dead Sea, Israel & Jordan

The Dead Sea, lies just a half-hour from Jerusalem, and is the lowest elevation on earth at 1290 feet below sea level. It’s eastern shore belongs to Jordan, and the southern half of its western shore belongs to Israel. The water in the Dead Sea is ten times saltier than regular seawater, and the air surrounding contains a higher concentration of oxygen.

Angkor Wat, Cambodia

Angkor Wat, Cambodia is a historical group of temples built in the 12th century, Angkor Wat is the largest spiritual complex in the world, and was originally constructed as a Hindu temple that would hold King Suryavarman II’s remains. In time, the structure was transformed into a Buddhist temple and became Buddhist monk gathering place.